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The world’s best video conferences are built on Jitsi.

Jitsi is a set of open-source projects that allows you to easily build and deploy secure video conferencing solutions. At the heart of Jitsi are Jitsi Videobridge and Jitsi Meet, which let you have conferences on the internet, while other projects in the community enable other features such as audio, dial-in, recording, and simulcasting.
A vibrant developer community.

First and foremost, Jitsi is a community of developers that are pushing the envelope of video conferencing quality on the web. Come join us!

A foundation for amazing products.

Our community members have developed countless projects and products that started with Jitsi code.
Check ‘em out!

Completely free video conferencing.

Jitsi is the best, most secure video conferencing solution available for free to anyone. Try it out and download it for free

Features

  • Jitsi Videobridge passes everyone’s video and audio to all participants, rather than mixing them first.
  • Better quality, lower latency and if you are running your own service, a much more scalable and inexpensive solution.
  • Jitsi is compatible with WebRTC, the open standard for Web communication.
  • Advanced video routing support for simulcast, bandwidth estimations, scalable video coding and many others.
  • Ubuntu and Debian packages for easy installation.

For more information, see our frequently asked questions.

Jitsi, then and now

2020

Jitsi surpasses 10 million monthly average users!

2018

8x8 acquires the Jitsi Technology and team from Atlassian. Jitsi now powers all 8x8 Video Meetings and continues to grow in the heart of many successful initiatives

2015

Atlassian acquires Blue Jimp, making a long-term investment in keeping Jitsi open source, community-based, and pushing the envelope of great video conferences.

2014

Using a prototype from Philipp Hancke as a basis, the Jitsi community starts the Jitsi Meet project: a Web Conferencing application that rivals Hangouts and Skype

2013

Jitsi’s video routing capabilities are extracted in a separate server application and Jitsi Videobridge is born. Later this year Jitsi Videobridge adds support for ICE and DTLS/SRTP, thus becoming compatible with WebRTC clients. This is a first step to its importance in today’s WebRTC ecosystem.

2012

Jitsi adds video conferencing capabilities based on the concept of routing video streams. The client of the conference organizer acts as a video router.

2011

SIP Communicator is renamed Jitsi (from the Bulgarian “жици”, or “wires”), since it now also supports audio and video over XMPP’s Jingle extensions and it would be silly to still call it SIP Communicator.

2009

Emil Ivov founds the Blue Jimp company, which employs some of Jitsi’s main contributors. They offer professional support and development services.

2008

JsPhone departs from the JAIN SIP reference implementation project, and becomes a separate project on java.net. It’s renamed SIP Communicator, since it mostly made audio/video calls through the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP).

2007

We get our own Wikipedia entry. Look out, world.

2005

SIP communicator is completely rearchitected, adopting a new OSGi based design to make it easier to write plugins for the project.

2003

Emil Ivov, a student at the University of Strasbourg, France, creates JsPhone. He also teaches salsa and West Coast swing.